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Hooray! It's opposite day. Linked lists go the opposite way today.

Write a function for reversing a linked list. Do it in-place.

Your function will have one input: the head of the list.

Your function should return the new head of the list.

Here's a sample linked list node class:

function LinkedListNode(value) { this.value = value; this.next = null; }

We can do this in space. So don't make a new list; use the existing list nodes!

We can do this is in time.

Careful—even the right approach will fail if done in the wrong order.

Try drawing a picture of a small linked list and running your function by hand. Does it actually work?

The most obvious edge cases are:

  1. the list has 0 elements
  2. the list has 1 element

Does your function correctly handle those cases?

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time and space. We pass over the list only once, and maintain a constant number of variables in memory.

This in-place reversal destroys the input linked list. What if we wanted to keep a copy of the original linked list? Write a function for reversing a linked list out-of-place.

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